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you see israel at this moment after gaza, after the palestinian vote at the united nations? >> well, i think that the gaza operation was necessary. they -- the operation started with the killing of one of the murderers and terrorists. there was responsible for the almost endless attacks against israelis, innocent citizens inside of t state of israel. >> rose: but at the same time, hadn't he been doing some negotiations and dealings in terms of trying to promote certain ideas? >> after he's there, there were all kinds of rumors about it, but during the times i was prime minister there were always kinds of ideas that were raised by third parties that we may negotiate indirectly with him but he was dedicated to one thing, to the destruction of the state of israel and therefore this outcome was inevitable. >> rose: but speaking of that, is it now understood that there will not be targeted assassinations in gaza? >> well, israel always said if there there will not be an attempt to launch rockets against israeli civilians then there will not be such activities then israel will not have a rea
by germany's decision, particularly last week, at the united nations to abstain on that vote on upgrading the unstatus of the palestinians. israel believes that that change in status will make the palestinians less willing to make compromises, and prime minister netanyahu expressed his disappointment on that front again. although he said he did not question germany's motives, he said of course germany thought that its decision to abstain would be more likely to lead to peace. another problem is the question of settlements. i think the german government's criticism of israeli settlements reflects a growing frustration in the german public about israel's position, but as prime minister netanyahu also said, in the end, peace will not be made in germany or in new york but on the ground in direct talks between the two sides. >> thanks very much for joining us. >> berlin says it is authorizing the deployment of 400 troops to help station patriot missiles on turkey's border with syria. the move is a sign of solidarity with turkey, also a nato member. >> dutch and american soldiers will also be e
, cheryl saban, who's being doing heroic work as a public delegate with our team at the united nations. there are so many friends here, and it's always a little dangerous -- in fact, a lot dangerous -- to acknowledge or point out any. but obviously, i want to thank martin indyk and tamara wittes and all the thinkers and scholars whose insights help us navigate this very difficult, challenging time. i also want to say a special word to two friends who are retiring. one, senator joe lieberman, who is leaving the senate and going into standup comedy, i'm told. [laughter] he's got a lot of good lines; i've heard many of them over the years. but he and hadassah deserve some very well merited time for themselves. and of course, ehud barak, who's announced his retirement. and so we want to wish you very much happiness in the future as well. let me also acknowledge the chairman of my authorizing and oversight committee, senator john kerry. [applause] >> thank you, john. and teresa heinz, it's wonderful seeing you here as well. [applause] my congresswoman, nita lowey, who does such a great job
, that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time, it was a working level staff position. her first in government. ambassador rice could make announcements, but wouldn't be involved in making such an important decision about getting involved militarily in rwanda and president clinton said he made the decision. it was the greatest mistake of his presidency. and susan rice traveled to rwanda shortly after the genocide and said seeing the horrors of rwanda, the ground littered with hundreds of thousands of bodies is what actually made her passionate about the issue of preventing genocide in the future. she realized this was a wrong decision of the administration. she returned when she became u.n. ambassador, spoke about that experience and there's also a quote from her in the book reference by rabbi shmuley in which she swore that if she ever faced a crisis like that again, she would argue for dramatic action and then in her words, go down in flames. >> so, why religious leaders, especially these two, speakin
of the united nations that president assad probably should not expect any mercy from his counterparts around the world. jonathan hunt has more on that from the united nations here in new york. jonathan, quite a debate about the asylum question for assad. and the question is the question is whether president bashar assad has taken the final decision to as he once said live and die in syria. if he does die, it's most likely to be, of course, at the hands of the rebels when they make their final push into the center of damascus, a push which most experts believe is coming. all whether president assad might now be willing to or trying to seek asylum in some friendly country. that would probably boil down to cuba, ecuador venezuela or russia. u.n. secretary general was asked about the asylum question today he did not seem to favor the idea. listen. >> the united nations must not allow any impunity whoever commits gross violation of human rights must be held accountable and should be brought to justice. >> that sentiment was echoed by officials at the u.s. state department who said there has to be
to the united nations, susan rice comes under fire again. this time, it's over rwanda. let's go "outfront. >>> good evening, welcome, everyone. "outfront" tonight breaking news, president obama puts the syrian president on notice. the president is reacting to new evidence that assad's regime has started mixing chemicals to make deadly sarin gas, adding to its massive stockpile of chemical weapons. >> and today i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command, the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> assad is on the edge of president obama's so-called red line against syria. the president said this summer that syria's use or movement of chemical weapons could mean u.s. intervention. so outfront tonight, barbara star. how exactly -- how clear is the evidence that they are moving in a new step with chemical weapons. >> it was just over the weekend in the last few days the intelligence began coming in.
. the united nations is pulling all of their "nonessential international staff" from syria as fighting intensifies in damascus. this is amateur video that reportedly shows violent airstrikes in a suburb but fox news cannot confirm the. >> -- confirm the the authencity. hillary clinton was not clear about what the red line would be? >>reporter: that is right. for the talk about a "red line" is seen as crossing, officials are being vague about the actions by the americans that it would trigger. >> we think it is important to prepare if contingency planning. we are actively consulting with friends, and allies and the opposition. i would not want to speculate what actually might happen. >>reporter: the sites where certain president bashar al-assad stores and maintains the stockpiles of chemical weapons and their related components are broadly speaking, known to american intelligence agencies much the step up movement at the locations was first reported by "new york times" and senior officials confirmed it to fox news and added "we don't know if the scenes plan to use them but there are tro
at the time of the again side, the rwanda again side. that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time it was a working level staff position. her first in government, ambassador rice could make announcements at that level, but wouldn't be involved making an important decision getting involved militarily in rwanda. president clinton said he made the decision, it was the greatest mistake of his presidency, and ambassador rice travelled to rwanda after the again side. she said seeing the ground littered with hundreds of thousands of bodies is what made her passionate about the issue of preventing again side in the future. she realized this was a wrong decision of the administration. she spoke about that experience. and there's also a quote from her in this book reference, in which she swore if she ever faced a crisis for that again, she would argue for dramatic action and go down in flames. >> so then why -- why religious leaders, especially these two speaking out against her, drug and alcohol abuse is up.
by the united nations kamal things that this administration is doing in this book. by the way, service members, those who are serving overseas, soldiers, sailors, airmen, garcia, marines to make you want to get a signed copy get oliver north. on the side of that boston will be up there in new york next week. the army navy game. that ad in the middle of the program. i have to say, the army. lou: i have k t. mcfarland and a host of folks, admiral james lyons, they're going to be right with you on that. >> you got it to my brother. it will be a great game, no afford to being in new york with you on monday. lou: the floor to it. you can get a copy of euros proved on-line or at bookstores now. go to to get a link that will work as well. twenty-seven days until the fiscal cliff. president obama and the speaker still not negotiating. are they serious about solving this crisis? the "a-team". they join us in moments. obamacare at least one year away from full implementation. but you don't have to wait for the tax hikes. $317 billion in new taxes. set to kick in january 1st. and we will sho
who are saying that in light of the vote at the united nations where the palestinians managed to get that upgraded status, that all of those assurances are null and void, michael. >> all of this pressure that's being put on. israel has been good at ignoring outside pressure on anything. i'm curious about the palestinian side. that u.n. status upgrade does, of course, given the palestinians potential access to a whole raft of u.n. bodies, including the international criminal court. what are the palestinians saying about their options going forward? >> well, the palestinians are saying that all opings are on the table. of course aring the palestinian authority condemned the fact that these housing places were now back on the table, and, of course, they are saying that one of the avenues that they might pursue is the international criminal court, as you said, as a nonmember observer state in the u.n. general assembly. they have access to the international criminal court, and one of the big issues has always been the israeli settlement building in the west bank, which, of course, is seen
't understand it or he was just not factual in what he said because the united nations has absolutely zero, zero, i mean zero ability to order or to tell or to -- they can suggest. they have no legal capacity to tell the united states to do anything under this treaty. nothing. >> and yet the treaty was struck down. senator kerry was referring there as well to rick santorum's daughter, bella. senator santorum's daughter has a genetic disorder and senator kerry says that senator santorum and other republicans that voted against the treaty did so because they hate the united nations. more meetings, more talking. sad to report no real solution today and that pretty much sums up the fiscal cliff negotiations. i feel like a broken record. here we go again on the countdown. day 26. got another 24 hours closer to the edge of the fiscal cliff which is why we have our eyes on the white house press briefing. got a live picture ready for you so we don't miss anything. for what it's worth, president obama and house speaker boehner are talking. they had a nice telephone conversation. that's terrific. the firs
as lawmakers rejected a united nations treaty on disability rights. the treaty calling for disabled people to enjoy the same rights and freedoms as other citizens has been ratified by 126 other countries. >>> the warden in a north carolina prison has been suspended pending an investigation of prisoners allegedly being ordered to rub hot sauce on their private parts. >>> and curtis owes more than $90,000 in back child payments and has been ordered to stop having children. he has nine with six different women. >>> off the coast of turkey, at least four people have died and ten are missing after a cargo ship sank in the black sea. a rescue boat also crashed on to the rocks and sank. and nasa is planning to build a cheaper mars rover by 2020. because of budget cuts, they will use spare parts and design plans to build the new craft for only $1.5 billion. >>> now over to wall street for a look at your wednesday morning markets. the dow opens at 12, 951 after losing 13 points yesterday. the s&p was down 2. the nasdaq fell 5. overseas, the nikkei gained 36 while the hang seng shot up 470. >>> good
people was also in the core and the national security interest of the united states and the region. moreover, this change would align with our values of supporting the space process and the basic rights and freedoms that should be enjoyed by all people regardless of religion, ethnicity and gender. over the course of the past 20 months, the al-assad regime has unleashed a barrage of terror across the country with the plane of remaining in power. we are just hearing about in last couple of days, the last couple of hours more urgently about weapons of mass destruction and what that could mean. more than 40,000, we know that is a conservative number. more than 40,000 syrians have been killed, and countless have been injured. refugees have surged into neighboring turkey, jordan, lebanon and iraq taxing the limits of those countries capacities and creating a regional crisis. the escalation of violence has reached a point where the fighter jets have been used to kill civilians standing in bread line according to the human rights watch. it's hard to comprehend that happening in any country
recognized by the united nations. the joy short-lived. how israel's decision to pursue even more settlements in the west bank and east jerusalem may kill any hopes of peace. we'll dive deep lie into this issue. >>> rp says it's not changing plans for the controversial housing development in east of jerusalem also developments in east jerusalem. this is despite getting a diplomatic mackdown recently from australia, five european countries and the united states bought in on this yesterday. now here's why this is such a big deal. the proposed construction would effectively cut off the west bank from cities of like bethlehem and ramallah, will cut them off from jerusalem. and that's important for the palestinians, it would mean that they couldn't get to east jerusalem, which they would eventually claim as the capital of their nation if that is to be. the large israeli settlement town of ma ale adumim would be connected to jerusalem directly. vice president for new initiatives and a distinguished scholar at the woodrow wilson international center. always good to talk to you. israel defined as i i
of systemic violations of human rights. iran has refused access to the united nations for several years, and the ug general assembly submitted a report in which he said he was, quote, deeply troubled by increased numbers of executions. a pew addition, arbitrary arrests and detention, unfair trials, torture, and ill treatment, and crackdown on human rights activityist, lawyers, journalist, and opposition activists, and to draw an example from the week's news theres actually what i gas what qualifies in iran for a slight bit of goodness. a well-known human rights lawyer ended her 49-day hunger strike on december 4th. her name is nasarn, and she has in prison since 2010, and the regime imposed a travel ban on her husband and her daughter so she was on a hunger strike for 49 days, and has actually stopped the hunger strike amid word the regime is going to lift the travel ban. so, the victories are small and hard-on and the news is relentlessly negative, but it comes at an interesting moment both for iran, which has apartmently elections next june, typically during periods of time when there
at the united nations this afternoon. it seems there is a battle for a capital city that could be shaping up and that is crucially important. >>jonathan: yes. there is no doubt we have entered a new and very significant stage in the battle for syria and that is in essence of battle for the capital of damascus which has been going on for five or six days. president bashar al-assad wants do and indeed has to hang on to the capital if he is to stay in power. there are many experts who believe either way, he has decided to fight to the death. either if he tries to flow he will be killed by his own supporters who will feel betrayed him him or ultimately he will be killed by the rebels. this, while it does seem to be the end days for the bashar al-assad regime, it could yet stretch on for some days or even weeks. that because the rebels simply are not strong enough to defeat the syrian security forces in one battle. what we are seeing is an intense battle of attrition. most experts will tell you, his days are numbered. >> the big question on the international stage now, jonathan, will he use the c
in the middle of this battle. john bolton joins me now, former u.s. ambassador to the united nations and a fox news contributor. this, as i said, ambassador bolton, feels like it is going to a new level. in terms of that red line that leon panetta talks about is it filling the canisters? is it moving them into place? where exactly does the red line happen do you think? >> i think it is unclear and part of the reason about the threats by the administration don't have credibility, previous red liens have already been crossed. moving the agent from its storage locations. i think in assad's situation he is very close to seeing the end of his regime. so if the choice for him is death at the hands of the opposition or using chemical weapons, threats by outsiders really are not going to sway him that much. martha: when you look back to the clinton administration and hillary clinton is very much involved in these discussions here. president clinton had said allowing genocide to happen in rwanda was one of his greatest failures in office. we know the president spent time with bill clinton recently. wha
and the united nations. prime minister, thanks, as usual, for joining us. >> thank you, wolf. >> good to see you the other day in jerusalem. let's talk about what's happening in the middle east right now. the u.s., the obama administration, nato now obviously very concerned about the regime of president assad potentially using chemical weapons, poison gas against its own people. here's the question, what is the difference killing civilians in syria with bombs from jet fighters or attack helicopters as opposed to using say poison gas or chemical warfare? >> that's a good question. in one sense in moral terms, there is no difference and almost 40,000 people have died in syria already. but i think the use of chemical weapons and poison gas, i think the fatalities would be very much greater. and it does cross a line. these aren't judgments that you can make in any scientific way. but i think what your administration, the international community is signaling to president assad, if you cross that line, there will be a strong reaction. >> those are tough words coming from president obama, from secretar
that reflects the will of the syrian people is also the core national security interests of the united states in the region. moreover this change would align with our values supporting the democratic process, the basic rights and freedom that should be enjoyed by all people regardless of religion, ethnicity or gender. over the course of the last 20 months the assad regime has unleashed a barrage of unspeakable terror across the country with the sole aim of remaining in power. just hearing in the last couple days, more urgently about weapons of mass destruction and what that could mean. more than 40,000 syrians have been killed, cal was have been injured. refugees surged into neighboring turkey, jordan, lebanon and iraq taxing the limits of those countries and creating a regional crisis. assad's escalation of violence has reached the point where fighter jets have been used to kill civilians according to human-rights watch. hard to comprehend that happening in any country but that is what has played out. this regime's shocking capacity for widespread terror will only grow as we see reports that
not factual in what he said, because the united nations has absolutely zero, zero, i mean zero ability, to order or to tell or to -- i mean, they can suggest. but they have no legal capacity to tell the united states to do anything under this treaty. nothing. >> tonight, many disability rights advocates are saying politics trump the welfare of the disabled everywhere. seven-term democratic congressman of rhode island is among the many supporters of the u.n. treaty, the first quadriplegic person to serve in the u.s. house. before yesterday's vote he talked with former senator bob dole in the senate chamber. the congressman joins me now. you voted for this treaty. you joined senator mccain and kerry earlier this week calling for its ratification. why do you think it's so important? >> first, anderson, thank you for having me on the program. thank you for paying attention to this very important issue. this issue is important, not just for people here in the united states, but most especially for people around the world who don't yet enjoy the same protections that people -- disabled peopl
by the conflict in syria. we don't really know the numbers of displaced people inside syria. the united nations says close to half a million have been pushed outside of the country to neighboring countries, like iraq, lebanon, turkey, jordan. the united nations secretary general ban ki moon, he is visiting camps in jordan and turkey, calling for more international assistance for these refugees, and warning also that the numbers could dramatically increase in just the next month or two if the conflict drags on. for the people here, well, it's only december. we've been here an hour or two, and i'm freezing from the freezing rain here. it's just the beginning of december. winter is coming. ivan watson, cnn, on the syrian border. >> the man has been arrested and charged with trying to give classified information about u.s. submarines to russia. more on the seemingly cold war era story up next. anncr: some politicians seem to think medicare and... social security are just numbers in a budget. well, we worked hard for those benefits. we earned them. and if washington tries to cram decisions about the
and chinese governments. the administration was right to initially work through the united nations. but due to russian and chinese intransigence, the syrian suffering has continued. ambassador ford has led the charge in coordinating humanitarian assistance. let me share a few thoughts on this brave american, ambassador afford. i am glad he had a chance to catch up with you today and speak to you. his personal courage and commitment, seeing a way forward in syria is remarkable. his visit in july of 2011 stand as a testament to american commitment and concern for the syrian people. i was proud to cheer his confirmation hearing to stand as ambassador, and have appreciated his friendship and openness to engage. he is precisely the kind of diplomats we need in these challenging times in the middle east, and we need more robert fords. ambassador ford and his team have led an effort to support a more cohesive and moderate opposition political groups in syria. this has not been easy. opposition political organizing is difficult in the best of circumstances. not to mention during a war and after dec
-and-trade? reporter: sure, that is right. while liberal groups and others are looking for what the united nations is doing, what we used to call a kyoto at all, that process when he couldn't get a process through, he knows darn well he's not going to get through now. pushing out carbon heavy fuels like coal out of the u.s. energy mix. you mentioned west virginia. folks like democrats from those states are not happy about that. megyn: the nrdc says its approach will cost $4 billion a year. but they claim it will save over $25 billion each year in reduced pollution related illnesses like asthma. so we will wait and see if there's any action. thank you so much. dramatic new amateur video on the streets of serious capital. rebel forces battling government troops in damascus today. you can see rebel snipers shooting from inside buildings. secretary of state hillary clinton now raising more concerns that bashar al-assad may resort to using chemical weapons against his own people. hillary clinton saying the u.s. is worried about an increasingly desperate bashar al-assad may use the weapons or lose contr
are they reacting? was is our response? >> our response tends to look first to the yate united nation. there is talk of proportional sanctions being considered at the security council should north korea test. but it's clear that is not going to change the trajectory of north korea's per suit of a nuclear program. bill: steven yates, thank you. we are watching this, sometime we believe in the coming days to 10 days. here's martha. martha: $120 million to develop the next electric car battery. it's not an independent venture. you are paying for it. the u.s. taxpayer. we'll tell you about the government's latest gamble with your money. bill: one man' home survived superstorm sandy. but it did not make it through the recovery. >> the township didn't know what happened. i called the governor' office and she said to me, are you sure your house is gone? i said, miss, you miss place a pen or pencil, you don't miss place a house. ♪ i wish my patits could see what i see. ♪ that over time, having high cholesterol and any of thesrisk factors can put them at increased risk for plaque buildup in their arterie
francisco today. we bought naval forces from the united states, from russia and japan all to honolulu where we had simulated a tsunami disaster. and these three great nations brought their fleets to honolulu exercising how to respond and alleviate that disaster. well, that was then. how about now? last year the united states released a new security strategy. most of you probably have not even heard of that, but i have to tell you this was a big deal. it was one of the fifth american security strategies that we have issued since the civil war. among the highlights of that security strategy was a strong statement that the united states had the highest economic and security interests in the asia pacific region. not in europe as has been for 100 years prior to that, than the asia pacific region. secondly, that we would maintain freedom of access throughout that region. in particular, we would maintain the sea lanes in that area, whatever the challenge might be. even as we reduce our defense budget, therefore we must maintain and would maintain a powerful navy, and that that navy would be charge
the united states to formally recognize the national coalition is the sole legitimate representative of the syrian people. we are working very hard with the leadership of the coalition to make adjustments to perhaps introduce quotas as a temporary measure to make sure we are adequately represented at the syrian society and we want to push forward to begin assuming functions of this state is supporting the local councils that are cropping up. >> okay. we need to go in q&a. one quick thing before we start but i hope it's some point in this day someone will address the question of, how you mention the hope that some remnant to see would be involved in an effort to coalesce from government. .. excellent description ever what at least that body would like to see the united states stand for with regard to syria. perhaps i'd like to comment the panelists to see what the bipartisan unanimous measure might add to the clarity of the u.s. vision at blueprint for what we want to see next presending from all the shall we say tactical and diplomatic and other considerationings we have been discuss
. such a chain reaction is not in a national interest of the united states. the solution to this problem requires renewed american leadership or partnership to increase the development of resources that lag across the south caucasus. and central asia as well as the infrastructure, the pipelines and other things needed to transport these resources. i would also like to elaborate a little bit more about bahrain. we have some people on the panel today that we will ask questions about bahrain. and they have some intimate knowledge of some of the problems that have taken place there, and as i said before, the concerns that we have in the car cases, the whole region is only a part of the concern that we feel for the region. bahrain has been an ally of the united states for a long, long time. we have our fifth -- and the attempts by iranians to work with dissident forces there in bahrain to undermine the government is something that we must be concerned about. i talked to the leadership over there, and they are concerned about the problems that some of the people feel toward the government and they have
to reestablish its claim there by military coercion and that could lead them into a confrontation with the united states' desire to maintain free access. the best way of avoiding that military conflict is what we should see because the military conflict with china would be catastrophic for both nations, indeed for the whole region. so, we want to avoid that. i believe the best way of avoiding that is by maintaining a -- continuing to maintain a strong naval presence in the region, and by having an unambiguous commitment to doing that. i believe that our new national security strategy is that unambiguous commitment, and i believe that the u.s. navy is capable of maintaining that unambiguous military strength. as we sit here this morning aboard the uss macon island, in san francisco bay, looking out to the pacific, it is easy to believe that the united states is, in fact, a pacific power and that to keep it that way we will maintain the best damn navy in the world. thank you very much. (applause)speaker .... >> now i'm going to introduce our next speaker, major general melvin spee splt e i've know
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area of national defense. and the election was nearly a month ago, but many states are still tallying their ballots. the united states election project is gathering some of that data and as found 28 states are reporting their official and final results. according to that samples size 59% of eligible voters cast their ballots this november and in nevada .6% voted for none of the above in the presidential race. >> that's the only state allowing that option. be right back. alright, in 15 minutes we're going to do the young turks. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of his ability, is trying to look out for us. [ ♪ theme ♪ ] [ music ] >> broadcasting across the nation, on your radio and on current tv this is "the b
simes, president of the center for the national interest, a foreign policy think tank. and steven heydemann, a senior adviser for middle east initiatives at the united states institute of peace. he's worked with the syrian opposition on the challenges ahead once the assad regime falls. steve, to you first. what do you understand the situation on the ground to be right now in syria? >> we have seen in the past month a significant shift in the momentum of events on the ground. we have seen the opposition increase the effectiveness of its tactics. it has acquired weapons that have permitted it to challenge the regime much more effectively across a broad range of fronts ranging from the south of syria to damascus to the north, and we're seeing this reflected in the regime's response to the opposition including some of the activities surrounding movement of chemical weapons. we don't know exactly what's at stake but part of the speculation is that they're putting themselves into a position in which they could create a defensive zone if it turns out to they're unable to defend damascus
to light the national christmas tree. ♪ santa claus is coming to town ♪ music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> some diplomats saying a chemical threat from syria could be imminent. secretary of state hillary clinton repeated syria's president assad must go in any political arrangement and warned though she and russia's foreign minister are working together on a political solution they remain far from a breakthrough. joining me is former defense secretary william cohen, thanks so much for joining us. >> good to be this you. >> russia sounded a few different signals this week. putin in turkey, making some suggestions perhaps they would not be sticking with assad as strongly as they h
, the rest of the national conversation gets distorted and pulled way over to the right. that's what's happening. >> ron, i love the way you suggest that the real patriots are the ones who want to secede from the united states. it reminds me -- we once had a priest named father feeney. he didn't like the church's view because the church didn't support no salvation outside the church. so he leaves the church. that's just like -- wait a minute, you're one of them now. that doesn't make any sense. it's like we're so patriotic, we're going to leave this country. >> we're going to leave the country. they'll have to come up with a new name as they go. it's not just the south. parts of the plains, too, but it would seem to me as long as we could get like from the northeast -- could get air rights over canada to get to the west coast we could keep something of a nation together. >> what would be their preferred nation to join? >> you know they're not going to mexico. >> they ain't going to denmark. they don't like socialism. they're not going to go where all the white people are. what do the
is hurting our community and the economy of the united states. but we also feel that outsourcing is hurting our economy. >> reporter: that's not the case at all according to the harbor employees association. they say the strike impact is winding and it's costing the national economy billions of dollars. once again, a lot of estimates here say we are talking about $1 billion a day being lost. we are talking about truckers and people not going to work each day as this continues. we are told almost everything has been agreed upon but the one pain issue which is the issue about whether jobs should be kept here when someone retires or whether they can be added someplace else. megyn: growing international concerns over a report that syria is readying deadly and widely banned chemical weapons for combat use. we'll talk about what those chemicals are, what they can do and why america and the world is so worried about this. we are getting a look at george zimmerman's bloody face the night he shot and killed trayvon martin. why didn't the defense get this picture earlier? a new report suggests presid
. and republican senator bob corker. also on the program is the israeli a bastard to the united states. cnn's state of the union follows and welcomes the managing director of the international monetary fund, christine lagarde. at 4:00 p.m., here "face the nation"where they talked with alan simpson and erskine bowles. also on the program, an interview with cory booker. the sunday network tv shows are repairing here on c-span at noon -- here on cspan radio. listen to them all on cspan radio on 90.1 fm in the washington, d.c. area and nationwide on siriusxm radio. [video clip] >> the staff had to make the plan for the invasion of japan without considering the atomic bomb. it was estimated that to cocker the land would cost 700,000 man and 500,000 of them would be maimed for life. >> i choose to honor both the sacrifice of american servicemen fighting their way through the pacific and a little girl like sadako who died as a result of the atomic bomb. it is unimaginable with the most of them like to be close to that we're that far ball or originated and the blast was strongest. >> follow the journey th
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